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Seventh Day Adventist Church

Facts About Anxiety

Medical definition: A feeling of apprehension and fear, characterized by physical symptoms such as palpitations, sweating, and feelings of stress.

Other common symptoms include:

--Feeling nervous, restless or tense

--Having a sense of impending danger

--Breathing rapidly (hyperventilation)

--Trembling

--Feeling weak or tired

--Trouble concentrating or thinking about anything other than the present worry

 

Levels of Anxiety

These are typically classified by the level of distress and impairment experienced and may include:

Mild anxiety - anxiety that is manageable without any additional techniques; you can still get through your day without panicking, you can enjoy a social life, and you can even find hobbies and activities fun.

 

Moderate anxiety - the disturbing feeling that something is definitely wrong; the person becomes nervous or agitated. The person can still process information, solve problems, and learn things with assistance from others.

 

Severe anxiety - when you worry more than a situation warrants, you realize it but can’t shake your anxiety; this leaves you feeling irritable or tired.

 

Panic level anxiety (panic disorder) - frequent, recurring and unexpected panic. A panic attack can include symptoms such as rapid onset of extreme fear, palpitations.

 

Root Cause of Anxiety

There are a multitude of sources that could trigger anxiety, such as environmental factors e.g. a job or personal   relationship, medical conditions, traumatic past experiences, and the holiday season. Most people indulge in food and sugary drinks during the holidays, so to help keep your nerves calm during this time of year try the tips below:

--Stay away from sugary, alcoholic, drinks. Instead, try caffeine free Green Tea, Valerian Tea, Chamomile Tea, cherry juice, or plain water.

--Exercise

 

It is a normal human response to be anxious in certain situations; however, if you feel anxious all or most of the time, you may want to consider seeking professional help.

 

References: mayoclinic.org, adultmentalhealth.org, and menshealth.com

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